#SRHaccess Facebook LIVE Recap: Adolescent Hip Conditions

Dec 20, 2017 / Hip Disorders

#SRHaccess Facebook LIVE Recap: Adolescent Hip Conditions

On this week’s Facebook live, Chief of Staff Daniel J. Sucato, M.D., M.S. and our former patient, Case, joined us to discuss Case’s hip condition. Below is a recap of the conversation.

Case Brabham - former patient
  • Presented with hip pain to the hospital at 15 years old.
  • As a high school athlete who was complaining about consistent hip pain, his parents researched hip specialists in the Dallas area and his pediatrician referred him to Scottish Rite Hospital.
  • His initial clinic visit included a physical exam and MRI. Case was diagnosed with mild hip dysplasia. This meant that his hip socket was not in the right place, which caused joint pressure and pain.
Warning signs and potential causes of hip dysplasia:
  • The cause of hip dysplasia is unknown, but there are various factors that put children at a higher risk:
    • First born 
    • Female
    • Born breech
    • Family history of hip dysplasia
Importance of multidisciplinary care for a patient like Case:
  • Treating the whole child – mind, body and spirit to determine the best treatment plan for each child.
  • Orthopedic team
  • Psychology team: to better understand his chronic pain and how to handle that as an adolescent. 
  • Movement Science Lab: to study the patient’s function, movement and range of motion. The data collected from the lab allows our doctors and researchers to see a more in-depth view of the patient to better understand his or her condition. 
Why is it important for patients involved in research to come back for  their follow-up visits?
  • Research allows our specialists to always be learning to provide the best possible care to our patients. 
  • Many of the research projects are long-term follow-up studies. This type of research follows the patient into adulthood to evaluate the effectiveness of their treatment and helps our doctors determine how they can improve care. 
Watch the segment and learn more about our Movement Science Lab. 

You May Also Like: